How to create an AJAX call in WordPress step by step

WordPress essentially works thanks to PHP language that gets the requests from users and admins, processes these requests and finally constructs the results as HTML pages, ie, PHP sends to you the pages that you see in the browser. Request, process, results; it’s simple. Sometimes however, you need control some elements of the screen after the HTML page has been sent and displayed: a special message on the screen after a checkbox has been checked, the change of an image depending on a select field, etc. and you don’t want to make a new request again. You want that these little elements change on the screen without repeat the whole process of request, process, results… In these cases you need to use the AJAX technique.

The first historical reference to AJAX technique (Roman Villa at Halicarnassus, 4th century AD)

Beyond this more than dubious historical reference of the previous illustration 🙂 , AJAX is a technology of developement supported by javascript and designed precisely for doing these kind of tasks, ie, to comunicate the client site to the server side silently, without a complete requests, just with the execution of a concrete funcion or module on the server side with a few concrete results. Continue reading…

Creating a tree-type index of pages or TOC using wp_list_pages function

WordPress has the hability to works with nuclear posts and also with posts that can contain posts, ie, posts with hierarchical structure. Today we’re going to see how to create an list of the second ones, as an index of pages, Table of contents (TOC), etc.

Panzerbaum

As default, WordPress supports two different kinds of elements: posts and pages. The basic difference between them is that the first ones, are treated as individual elements, organized in a long linear list of elements (like the natural numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, for example) meanwhile the second ones have got a hierachical structure, ie, each element can contain elements that have also got hierarchical structure. Continue reading…

Your plugins ready for WordPress PolyGlots

Perhaps, you are writing a new WordPress plugin and perhaps, you do want to translate it… If this is your case, there are two approaches: to translate the code via a code translator programme, for example PoEdit, or to use the translations WordPress system called PolyGlots.

Close up of the Rosetta Stone replica

In the first case –translating via an external programme– you just follow the general i18n WordPress developement recomendations for local languages but, if you have choosen WordPress PolyGlots plataform then, in addition to the general i18n rules, you have to do some little changes in the code of your plugin. In fact, there are not a lot of changes to do, just a few ones. Continue reading…

Using wp_add_inline_script function. A Google Analytics example.

Until version version 4.4, in WordPress, there was only one way to add script files to the WordPress themes, the function wp_enqueue_script however, the new version 4.5 has introduced a new way, the function wp_add_inline_script that allows us to add javascript text scripts directly inside a template and that, in addition, it can be directly connected with other scripts. Let’s go to see how it works.

Example of using the wp_add_inline_script function

At bottom, this new function wp_add_inline_script is the equivalent for scripts files, to the wp_add_inline_script function is for CSS files. Let’s see how it works through and example based on adding the Google Analytics script to a WP theme. Continue reading…

Configuring WordPress Automatic Background Updates

Automatic background WordPress updates were introduced in versión 3.7 and since then, this module has been maintaining your installation updated and ready for working however in some cases, you don’t desire that your WordPress installation changes without your permission. Perhaps for compatibility with a special developement addition, perhaps for some non updated but critical plugin or any other reason you do need to control manually the WordPress Updates. If this is your case then go ahead but rather it is much better to leave the maintenance module quiet.

Configuring WordPress Automatic Background Updates

As the official documentation explains about the Automatic Background Update Module, this module has 4 different Types of working. Continue reading…

How to add the google-site-verification code or other API parameters to your WordPress themes

Webmasters Tools of Google is a set of useful utilities that allow you to control a lot of elements of your website and among them, specialy the reading of the list of your pages through the sitemap.xml file. It is really a fantastic tool for your SEO so I’m sure that you want to connect with it. For connecting your site with an specific Webmaster Tools account, google offers you several methods but, perhaps the easiest is the addition of an HTML meta tag in the HTML <head> of your pages containing the google-site-verification code. Today we’ll see a method for adding automatically this google-site-verification code in a theme and for extension, for adding any API codes, third party parameters, etc.

How to add the google-site-verification code or other API parameters to your WordPress themes

In fact, every day is more common to use APIs to access from your web to services offered by outside webs so I do really suppose you want to use easily the associated codes to all these APIs in your Themes. Continue reading…